Jun Sunseri, Professor

Open (1) Berkeley-Abiquiú Collaborative Archaeology (BACA) project

Open. Apprentices needed for the fall semester. Please do NOT contact faculty before September 11th (the start of the 4th week of classes)! Enter your application on the web beginning August 16th. The deadline to apply is Tuesday, August 29th at 8 AM.

Berkeley-Abiquiú Collaborative Archaeology (BACA) project is a community-based, collaborative partnership involving Berkeley archaeologists, the Merced del Pueblo de Abiquiú, and the Pueblo de Abiquiú Library and Cultural Center.

What is archaeological data good for once it’s collected?

URAP participants in the Berkeley Abiquiú Collaborative Archaeology (BACA) project will have the opportunity to turn raw archaeological data from New Mexico into meaningful databases and documentation that serves community partners. Materials from the project include artifacts, photographs, sketches, maps and descriptive forms from the last three years of work with the Pueblo de Abiquiú in northern New Mexico. Founded as a Spanish Land Grant by a ground of Genízaro people (or former indentured servants of indigenous origin) the Pueblo and the UC Berkeley team have been investigating questions of identity, heritage, and land and water rights. This past summer focused on the historic cultural watershed, especially irrigation system, of the Pueblo that is still in use today.





Transcription and Translation of English and Spanish Language Historical Documents from New Mexico (1760-1930)
Project Description: This project involves transcribing and translating historical documents from the archives of two prominent families in Abiquiu from the Spanish Colonial period through to the early 20th century. Most of the documents relate to land transactions, diligencias matrimoniales, government records, personal letters, and wills with probate lists This project will interest those with a knowledge of Spanish and a love of history. No previous experience required, beginner Spanish OK, more experienced readers preferred. Students are welcome to use documents for their own research projects.

Archaeological Map Digitization
Project Description: The Berkeley-Abiquiu Collaborative Archaeology Project has conducted three seasons of archaeological research, producing maps and other forms of spatial data illustrating features of historical and archaeological interest. The undergraduate apprentice will be responsible for digitizing these images in Adobe InDesign/Illustrator and/or ArcGIS. The preferred candidate will work with our research team to produce content-rich GIS map layers visually representing landscape features, architectural elements, and artifact frequencies.
Learning Outcome: Students knowledgeable with Adobe and/or ArcGIS will learn to apply those skills to archaeological projects. This project will appeal to those with an interest in history, archaeology, and/or landscape design.


Day-to-day supervisor for this project: Alexandra McCleary, Ph.D. candidate

Qualifications: The BACA project seeks a number of different skills to turn the data collected in the field last summer into meaningful products for our community partners that include: Converting raw data recorded in open data kit into database ready .csv files for filemaker Developing and coding user interfaces in Open Data Kit and Filemaker Connecting metadata information to photographs in Adobe Lightroom Editing video and photographs from summer field work and creating content for community and lab websites Working with GIS files of historic acequia networks and household survey Scanning and organizing hard-copy sketches, maps, and journals and curating content for collaborative publication with youth interns (field visit in October) Writing protocol documents guiding community partners to shared online data This URAP opportunity is excellent for students with experience and/or interest in: Computer Science and Coding Web Development Database Management Video and Photography Editing Creative Publication Archives Qualifications: Participants will work on a variety of tasks required to turn field data into meaningful information for our community partners. Most of the work will involve learning and using a variety of computer software, including databases (Filemaker and Open Data Kit Collect), graphics (Lightroom, Photoshop, Illustrator, and Quicktime), Web Publishing (Wordpress) and Geographic Information Systems (ArcMap and ArcGIS pro). Ideally apprentices will commit to three to six hours per week. Previous experience in or knowledge of archaeology is not required, but would be an advantage. Likewise experience and interest in coding would be an advantage for some, but not all, of the URAP tasks.

Weekly Hours: 3-6 hrs

Related website: http://arf.berkeley.edu/projects/bearbones/

Open (2) Zooarchaeological Collections Management

Open. Apprentices needed for the fall semester. Please do NOT contact faculty before September 11th (the start of the 4th week of classes)! Enter your application on the web beginning August 16th. The deadline to apply is Tuesday, August 29th at 8 AM.

This position involves coordinating and helping with the curation of comparative (non-human) skeletal specimens held in the Bear Bones Zooarchaeology lab. Specifically, this will involve supervised care, organization and accounting of mammals, fish, and bird skeletons. If desired, apprentices will also have the opportunity to assist with specimen prep, including care of our dermestid beetle colony. The Bear Bones Lab hosts data and collections from archaeological sites of diverse spatial and temporal origin, with research foci that engage an ever expanding network of cross-campus and community partners.

Day-to-day supervisor for this project: Alexandra McCleary, Graduate Student

Qualifications: This project will appeal to students interested in animal biology and/or archaeology. Students will gain experience in zooarchaeological methods, laboratory management skills, and experience in museum curation. The qualified student will demonstrate attention to detail and organizational skills.

Weekly Hours: 3-6 hrs

Related website: http://arf.berkeley.edu/projects/bearbones/

Open (3) “Bear Bones” Zooarchaeology Research Lab Website Design

Open. Apprentices needed for the fall semester. Please do NOT contact faculty before September 11th (the start of the 4th week of classes)! Enter your application on the web beginning August 16th. The deadline to apply is Tuesday, August 29th at 8 AM.

The Bear Bones Lab is looking for a team member to learn all about our ongoing projects and work with us to not only increase our web presence, but also make more accessible our community-partnered research to the public and partners whom we serve. The research cluster in Bear Bones has hosted data and collections from archaeological sites of diverse spatial and temporal origin, with research foci that engage an ever expanding network of cross-campus and community partners. We have digital resources from a variety of sources, including video of ethnoarchaeological butchery demonstrations by Native American community partners, 3D models of archaeological sites and landscapes captured by photogrammetry and LiDAR, and CTscan images of archaeological samples, among other files. The lab team would like to make these resources available to affiliated researchers and our community partners, with both public-oriented aspects and private resource hosting of shared archaeological data.

One or more student apprentices are needed to assist with the construction and expansion of the website that will be hosted by the Archaeological Research Facility domain. This will involve the construction of pages for our various research projects and affiliated researchers that will entail the presentation of various kinds of material, including text files, images, video, 3D interactive models, and databases. Students should develop experience in web design using Drupal or other relevant platforms and an understanding of the challenges currently being faced by archaeology and related fields in the on-line presentation of material.

The URAP student will be expected to help us introduce our website to our research affiliates and community partners at the end of the semester. The student will benefit from participating in original research and contributing in tangible way to professional networking, data sharing, and public archaeology.


Day-to-day supervisor for this project: Annie Danis, Ph.D. candidate

Qualifications: The successful candidate will be self-motivated, able to pay close attention to detail, and have the computing skills necessary related to website construction and maintenance. Preference given to students with previous knowledge of website design.

Weekly Hours: 3-6 hrs

Related website: http://arf.berkeley.edu/projects/bearbones/

Closed (4) Community-Partnered Ethnohistoric Research (2 projects)

Closed. This professor is continuing with Spring 2017 apprentices on this project; no new apprentices needed for Fall 2017.

1) San Ildefonso Oral History Project: Transcription and Translation of Indigenous Narratives.

This project explores the social and cultural life of Hñähño/Spanish speakers in the town of San Ildefonso Tultepec in the Mexican State of Queretaro. This project relates to contemporary rural life in Mexico and how aspects indigeneity, bilingualism, migration, and globalization shape personal and collective memory.

All audio-recordings were conducted in the colonia of El Bothe in the town of San Ildefonso Tultepec, Queretaro, Mexico. Currently, the project has about 10 hours of audio-recordings from five different participants.





2) Ethnographic and Ethno-historical Research on Central California Indigenous Groups

Analogy and uniformitarian assumptions are key and unavoidable components of archeological research. Analogy provides the basis for most archaeological interpretations. As part of this URAP experience the student will learn to create an ethnographic and ethno-historical database that will be the basis for providing culturally-relevant interpretations (e.g., direct-historical analogy) while taking into account significant historical events and processes (e.g., contact with European ‘explorers’, the Spanish missions, Russian merchants, and the Mexican Period) which were not a component of the culture memory methodology implemented by UC-Berkeley ethnographers during the late 19th and early 20th centuries.

Cultural descriptions for the creation and preparation of the world by ‘animals’ for humans will be recorded additionally, seasonal animal hunting, processing, cooking, cuisine, and discard. The information described above for animals will be recorded for plants. The student will also focus specifically on ethnographic and ethno-historical accounts describing European contact, Spanish missions, and Russian merchants.
The student will work primarily with documents collected by Dr. Isabel Kelly while she was a doctoral student at UC-Berkeley. She primarily worked with two Coast Miwok and Kashaya Pomo elders specifically, Tom Smith and Maria Copa. However, additional materials will be added throughout the semester. These include early explorer accounts of their journeys along the California Coast and interactions with Native peoples. The Student is expected to work 3 hours per week for each enrolled unit. The goal of the URAP position is to prepare students in thinking of interpretation and analogy and the complexities of applying ethnographic and ethnohistorical data to an archaeological context.




The Undergraduate Research Apprentice will transcribe and translate audio-recordings. S/he will transcribe audio-recordings in transcription software and translate rural Mexican Spanish to English. In addition, student will formulate related questions for the project to use in December 2015.


Day-to-day supervisor for this project: Mario Castillo, Graduate Student

Qualifications: Qualifications: Good academic record; computer and typing proficiency; verbal knowledge of Spanish

Weekly Hours: 3-6 hrs

Related website: http://arf.berkeley.edu/projects/bearbones/