Jun Sunseri, Professor

Closed (1) Berkeley-Abiquiú Collaborative Archaeology (BACA) project

Applications for Fall 2018 are now closed for this project.

Berkeley-Abiquiú Collaborative Archaeology (BACA) project is a community-based, collaborative partnership involving Berkeley archaeologists, the Merced del Pueblo de Abiquiú, and the Pueblo de Abiquiú Library and Cultural Center in northern New Mexico. Founded as a Spanish Land Grant by a ground of Genízaro people (former indentured servants of indigenous origin) the Pueblo and the UC Berkeley team have been investigating questions of identity, heritage, and land and water rights. This past summer focused on the historic cultural watershed, especially irrigation system, of the Pueblo that is still in use today.

What is archaeological data good for once it’s collected?
URAP participants in the Berkeley Abiquiú Collaborative Archaeology (BACA) project will have the opportunity to turn raw archaeological data from New Mexico into meaningful databases and documentation that serves community partners. Materials from the project include artifacts, photographs, sketches, maps and descriptive forms from the last three years of work with the Pueblo de Abiquiú in northern New Mexico.

This project will appeal to students with an interest in:
Geographic Information Systems
OR
Adobe Illustrator and Photoshop
OR
Database management and data entry
OR
Web Content Development

There are a number of positions open to URAPs for this project:

1. Field Record Management
This position will focus on turning the data collected during the 2017 BACA field season into a use-able digital collection of files. This includes scanning and organizing paper sketches, reviewing and standardizing excel files, organizing photos in lightroom, and completing inventory of digital field recording forms.

2. Archaeological Illustration
This position will focus on turning hand-drawn maps a sketches into publication ready images using Adobe Illustrator and Photoshop.

3. Geographic Information Systems
This position will assist the supervisor in standardizing all geospatial information collected during the 2017 BACA field season. This includes working in ArcGIS and creating publication-ready maps to send to our community partners for review.

4. Collaborative Media
This position will use audio-visual material from the 2017 field season to create online content for the Bear Bones and Abiquiú Library and Cultural Center websites. This position may also include working on a mobile tour application using audio files.

Day-to-day supervisor for this project: Annie Danis , Ph.D. candidate

Qualifications: 1. Field Record Management Required qualifications: attention to detail, experience with file organization, understanding of .jpg and .pdf filetypes Desirable but not essential qualifications: knowledge of Google Sheets, Microsoft Excel, FileMaker and/or other database software and/or Adobe Lightroom and Acrobat 2. Archaeological Illustration Required qualifications: attention to detail, knowledge of Adobe Illustrator and/or Photoshop Desirable but not essential qualifications: design or art background, interest in visual presentation of data 3. Geographic Information Systems Required qualifications: attention to detail, knowledge or coursework in GIS Desirable but not essential qualifications: interest in spatial data and modeling 4. Collaborative Media Required qualifications: previous experience with web content, familiarity with video and photo editing software Desirable but not essential qualifications: knowledge of WordPress and Photoshop, design experience

Weekly Hours: 3-5 hrs

Closed (2) Zooarchaeological Collections Management

Applications for Fall 2018 are now closed for this project.

This position involves coordinating and helping with the curation of comparative (non-human) skeletal specimens held in the Bear Bones Zooarchaeology lab. Specifically, this will involve supervised care, organization and accounting of mammals, fish, and bird skeletons. If desired, apprentices will also have the opportunity to assist with specimen prep, including care of our dermestid beetle colony. The Bear Bones Lab hosts data and collections from archaeological sites of diverse spatial and temporal origin, with research foci that engage an ever expanding network of cross-campus and community partners.

Day-to-day supervisor for this project: Alexandra McCleary, Graduate Student

Qualifications: This project will appeal to students interested in animal biology and/or archaeology. Students will gain experience in zooarchaeological methods, laboratory management skills, and experience in museum curation. The qualified student will demonstrate attention to detail and organizational skills.

Weekly Hours: 3-5 hrs

Related website: http://arf.berkeley.edu/projects/bearbones/

Closed (3) “Bear Bones” Zooarchaeology Research Lab Website Design

Applications for Fall 2018 are now closed for this project.

The Bear Bones Lab is looking for a team member to learn all about our ongoing projects and work with us to not only increase our web presence, but also make more accessible our community-partnered research to the public and partners whom we serve. The research cluster in Bear Bones has hosted data and collections from archaeological sites of diverse spatial and temporal origin, with research foci that engage an ever expanding network of cross-campus and community partners. We have digital resources from a variety of sources, including video of ethnoarchaeological butchery demonstrations by Native American community partners, 3D models of archaeological sites and landscapes captured by photogrammetry and LiDAR, and CTscan images of archaeological samples, among other files. The lab team would like to make these resources available to affiliated researchers and our community partners, with both public-oriented aspects and private resource hosting of shared archaeological data.

One or more student apprentices are needed to assist with the construction and expansion of the website that will be hosted by the Archaeological Research Facility domain. This will involve the construction of pages for our various research projects and affiliated researchers that will entail the presentation of various kinds of material, including text files, images, video, 3D interactive models, and databases. Students should develop experience in web design using Drupal or other relevant platforms and an understanding of the challenges currently being faced by archaeology and related fields in the on-line presentation of material.

The URAP student will be expected to help us introduce our website to our research affiliates and community partners at the end of the semester. The student will benefit from participating in original research and contributing in tangible way to professional networking, data sharing, and public archaeology.


Day-to-day supervisor for this project: Annie Danis, Ph.D. candidate

Qualifications: The successful candidate will be self-motivated, able to pay close attention to detail, and have the computing skills necessary related to website construction and maintenance. Preference given to students with previous knowledge of website design.

Weekly Hours: 3-5 hrs

Related website: http://arf.berkeley.edu/projects/bearbones/

Closed (4) The Historical Ecology of the Northern Great Basin: Insights from Connley Caves (35LK50), Oregon

Applications for Fall 2018 are now closed for this project.

Archaeological research of Oregon’s Fort Rock Basin has contributed insights into terminal Pleistocene and trans-Holocene occupations by small-scale societies. Connley Caves (Caves 1-6) were eroded by pluvial Fort Rock Lake and archaeological excavations have demonstrated the presence of nearly 4 m of well-stratified sediments, which contain tools characteristic of the Western Stemmed Tradition. Multiple researchers have investigated Connley Caves since the late 1960s. Initially excavated by Bedwell in 1967 and 1968 the site produced 14C dates that range from 10,600 ± 190 14C yr BP and 11,200 ± 200 14C yr BP. However, the 14C dates have been viewed with skepticism due to the expedient and coarse-grained excavation strategies employed by Bedwell, which included screening sediments over ¼ in mesh sieves.

In 2014 researchers revisited Connley Caves cave 4 and 5 to investigate the possibility of terminal Pleistocene and early Holocene human occupations using standard recovery methods including 1/8 in mesh sieves and fine-grained recovery methods through the collection of bulk sediment samples for flotation. In addition, human and non-human coprolites have been recovered for macro, micro, and genetic analyses.

As part of this URAP project, students will work with PhD candidate Gabriel Sanchez to analyze bulk sediment samples derived from cave 5. These samples are drawn from arbitrary and stratigraphic levels and features such as hearths. The sediments were found in association with Western Stemmed Tradition artifacts as well as locally extirpated fauna including Bison (Bison bison). Sanchez’s historical ecology research is focused on paleoenvironmental reconstructions derived from animal remains deposited in cave 4 and 5 by humans and non-humans through the analysis of screened excavation materials, flotation samples, and constituent analysis of human coprolites. Sanchez will contextualize the results of faunal analyses in relation to paleoecology, geoarchaeology, genetic, and paleoethnobotany datasets.


Participating students will learn to analyze an archaeological dataset using fine-grained recovery methods. This will include training in the flotation of bulk sediment samples to separate light and heavy fraction samples. Students will work with Sanchez to sort and analyze the archaeological materials including animal remains, lithic, charred and uncharred botanical remains, among other materials. Students interested in zooarchaeology will have an opportunity to be introduced to the analysis of archaeological animal remains. The skills learned through this URAP will be applicable to archaeological analyses in any context.


Day-to-day supervisor for this project: Gabriel Sanchez, Ph.D. candidate

Qualifications: Applicants should be self-motivated, pay close attention to detail, and able to work in collaboration with others. Background in anthropological archaeology, biology, osteology, and artifact analysis is encouraged but not necessary for the position.

Weekly Hours: 6-8 hrs
Related website: http://pages.uoregon.edu/ftrock/connley_caves_description.html