Ming Hsu, Professor

Open (1) Neuroeconomics: Decision-Making and the Brain

Open. Apprentices needed for the fall semester. Please do NOT contact faculty before September 11th (the start of the 4th week of classes)! Enter your application on the web beginning August 16th. The deadline to apply is Tuesday, August 29th at 8 AM.

Our lab is interested in how the brain computes and represents values that allow us to make decisions. These decisions range from the mundane and everyday, such as what to have for lunch, to truly momentous ones such as deciding on where to attend college.

This project, and others in our lab, will confront participants with incentivized (i.e., paid!) choice dilemma. Simultaneously, we will conduct functional MRI scans on participants to identify the brain regions involved in different types of decisions. Subsequently, we will conduct followup studies to test how behavior is affects when the particular neural circuits are disrupted.

Student researchers will be exposed to cutting-edge research integrating mathematical models and biological measures of behavior. The specific role of the student will be tailored to the strengths and interests of the student, including designing experiments, engage in data collection and data analysis, and to help writing research manuscripts.

Qualifications: Desirable but not essential: strong research interests sophomores or juniors computer and programming skills

Weekly Hours: to be negotiated

Related website: http://neuroecon.berkeley.edu

Open (2) Big data approaches to social sciences

Open. Apprentices needed for the fall semester. Please do NOT contact faculty before September 11th (the start of the 4th week of classes)! Enter your application on the web beginning August 16th. The deadline to apply is Tuesday, August 29th at 8 AM.

There is now increasing concern that the proliferation of AI-driven automation—particularly in areas dealing with labor markets, education, and criminal justice—may perpetuate and even amplify preexisting biases and social inequities facing certain groups of individuals.

This research project aims to develop and apply techniques to recognize, quantify, and correct social biases at the scale necessary to address these societal challenges. Students involved in the project will learn to apply cutting edge techniques in machine learning and computational neuroscience to these problems.

Specifically, student researchers will be trained to (1) mine online content ranging from news media, social media, and social networks, (2) developing computational models that capture underlying semantic meaning, and (3) combining semantics with computational neuroscience models to predict real-world and laboratory behavior and outcomes.

Student researchers will be exposed to cutting-edge research at the intersection of computational neuroscience and natural language processing. Students will explore new applications and extensions of these models, with applications ranging from psychology to economics to neuroscience.

Student researchers will be trained to (1) mine online content ranging from news media, social media, and social networks, (2) developing computational models that capture underlying semantic meaning , and (3) combining semantics with computational neuroscience models to predict real-world and laboratory behavior and outcomes.

Qualifications: Strong computational skills, interest in computational social science. Desirable, but not essential: Interest in computational neuroscience

Weekly Hours: to be negotiated

Related website: http://neuroecon.berkeley.edu