Bryan Wagner, Professor

Closed (1) Online Descriptive Catalog for Historical Records in Pointe Coupee, Louisiana

Closed. This professor is continuing with Spring 2017 apprentices on this project; no new apprentices needed for Fall 2017.

We will be working from an available handwritten inventory to create the first online descriptive catalog for the historical manuscripts held in the Clerk of Court's office in Pointe Coupee, Louisiana. These are among the oldest records in Louisiana, and they are especially important for our understanding of slavery and its aftermath. We will use Omeka (omeka.org) as the platform for this project.





Undergraduates will build the catalog using Omeka's robust and intuitive interface and will help to convert the existing records to this digital format.

Qualifications: Must read cursive. Must be prepared to learn to use the Omeka platform, but no computer programming knowledge is required. Some knowledge of either Spanish or French is desirable but not required.

Weekly Hours: to be negotiated

Related website: http://omeka.org/

Closed (2) Translating Slave Testimonies from Spanish and French

Applications for Fall 2017 are now closed for this project.

This project involves translating testimonies given by slaves accused of conspiring to revolt. The testimonies are in French and Spanish. We will be working mostly with typescripts and in some cases with original manuscripts. We will also be integrating the new translations into an online digital edition of primary materials related to Louisiana Slave Conspiracies. This project will appeal to students with interests in law, language, history, and African American Studies.

Translating, and in some cases, transcribing testimonies

Qualifications: Applicants should be fluent in Spanish and/or French. No special computer skills are required.

Weekly Hours: to be negotiated

Closed (3) Data Processing for Louisiana Slave Conspiracies Digital Mapping Project

Applications for Fall 2017 are now closed for this project.

This project involves extracting data about persons and places from translated
testimonies given by slaves accused of conspiring to revolt. Apprentices will be working with a team of researchers in Berkeley's D-Lab (dlab.berkeley.edu) building interactive maps and network visualizations from the testimonies. All data produced by apprentices will be incorporated into a Drupal-based online cartographic archive, Louisiana Slave Conspiracies. This project will appeal to students with interests in data science, geography, law, language, history, anthropology and African American Studies.

Students will be mentored in best practices for extracting demographic and geographical data from legal source materials. They will be collaborating with a team of digital geographers, data scientists, and legal scholars as members of the Louisiana Slave Conspiracies research team.

Day-to-day supervisor for this project: Patty Frontiera, Staff Researcher

Qualifications: No specific qualifications.

Weekly Hours: to be negotiated

Related website: http://dlab.berkeley.edu/