Edward Timke, Lecturer

Closed (1) French-American Woman Project

Closed. This professor is continuing with Fall 2017 apprentices on this project; no new apprentices needed for Spring 2018.

This project examines how French women have been constructed in American media and how American women have been constructed in French media since World War II. The methodology used is a close reading of secondary history articles and books as well as the analysis of images and text of magazines, newspapers, films, advertisements, and television programming. This research project contributes to an interdisciplinary understanding (calling from history, women's studies, French studies, international relations, and media studies) of U.S.-French relations from a gendered perspective and how women have been used as symbols of the nation between the U.S. and France.

The key subject areas for this project are advertising, gender, history, international relations, media, and textual and visual analysis.

URAP students will help build the project's secondary source materials and find pertinent media texts for further analysis.

Students will use Internet and other library databases to find relevant secondary literature and primary sources, which will then be cataloged and initially analyzed for further review. Students will not only engage in archival research using primary media sources, but they will also add depth to their understanding of U.S.-French relations from a media perspective.

This project's learning objectives are the following: learn more about Franco-American relations; learn more about the study of women in transnational research; learn archival and other research methods; apply theories, techniques of visual and textual analysis; refine, develop writing skills; hone, develop public speaking; plan for future research, coursework, professional work; provide opportunities to use and apply French language skills (if applicable).

Qualifications: Students must be able to work independently in libraries and at home. Students should also be comfortable with using shared online applications (e.g. Google Docs and Forms) and conducting deep Internet and database searches. Ideal candidates will have experience or an interest in archival research, database research, history, media history, French-American relations, document scanning and photography, data entry, and visual and textual analysis. Students with intermediate to native French listening and reading abilities are especially encouraged to apply. This project is not seeking any new apprentices for 2017-18. 1-3 units per term can be earned for this project (hours per week are negotiable).

Weekly Hours: to be negotiated

Off-Campus Research Site: Most of the work will be conducted on a computer at home (or anywhere with an Internet connection), although some work will require regular visits to UC Berkeley libraries.

Open (2) Circulating American Magazines Project

Open. Apprentices needed for the spring semester. Please do NOT contact faculty before February 5th (the start of the 4th week of classes)! Enter your application on the web beginning January 9th. The deadline to apply is Tuesday, January 23rd at 8 AM.

This project's goal is to map the intensity and reach of American periodicals over time. It is part of a multi-university digital humanities collaboration led by researchers at James Madison University and UC Berkeley. The primary task of this project is to take archived circulation data for major, historically significant American periodicals and make them manipulable online in an interface similar to interactive graphics found on the New York Times website. Additionally, the data that is collected and transformed will help the research team apply for national funding that will expand the scope and duration of this project. As such, students will have an opportunity to learn more about and contribute to the process of obtaining national research funding.

One position offers an opportunity to use coding for data collection, verification, and visualization.

The key subject areas for this project are digital humanities, history, media (especially magazines/periodicals), journalism, and data analysis and visualization.

Qualifications: Research apprentices will have three major tasks. The first task is to convert archival data into spreadsheet data (i.e. data entry of historic documents into Google Sheets). The second task is to organize and study the spreadsheet data and make it publicly searchable and manipulable using online visualization tools. In addition to these tasks, the third task is to conduct in-depth literature reviews related to the project's concerns with magazine circulations in America, which could include researching magazine histories and profiles. All students should be comfortable working independently and with using shared online applications such as Google Sheets and Forms. Ideal candidates will have experience or an interest in archival research, media history, magazines/periodicals, data entry, basic data analysis, data visualization. Students with skills in dynamic website design, coding, and data visualization/mapping are especially encouraged to apply (see next paragraph). For the coding position, a student needs the following: (1) experience authoring scripts with the Google App scripting language or with JavaScript (Google App scripting experience preferred); (2) familiarity with Google Drive and Google Apps (especially Google Sheets); (3) experience working with relational databases (strong knowledge of SQL preferred); (4) experience creating data visualizations, especially data charts; and (5) an ability to work with others remotely in collaborative coding. This project seeks 2-4 students for the 2017-18 Academic Year (only one semester of participation may be a possibility in some cases). 1-2 units per term can be earned for this project (hours are negotiable).

Weekly Hours: to be negotiated

Off-Campus Research Site: Most of the work will be conducted on a computer at home (or anywhere with an Internet connection), although some work will require regular visits to UC Berkeley libraries.

Closed (3) Satirical Advertising History Project

Closed. This professor is continuing with Fall 2017 apprentices on this project; no new apprentices needed for Spring 2018.

This project examines satirical advertising history. The methodology used is a close reading of secondary history articles and books as well as the analysis of images and text of magazines, newspapers, films, advertisements, and television programming. This research project contributes to an interdisciplinary understanding of audience and industry reflections on advertising as well as counter-currents to advertising.

The key subject areas for this project are advertising, history, humor, parody, satire, and textual and visual analysis.

URAP students will help build the project's secondary source materials and find pertinent media texts for further analysis.

Students will use Internet and other library databases to find relevant secondary literature and primary sources, which will then be cataloged and initially analyzed for further review. Students will not only engage in archival research using primary media sources, but they will also add depth to their understanding of advertising history.

This project's learning objectives are the following: learn more about advertising history; learn more about the study of humor, parody, and satire in advertising; learn archival and other research methods; apply theories, techniques of visual and textual analysis; refine, develop writing skills; hone, develop public speaking; and plan for future research, coursework, professional work.

Qualifications: Students must be able to work independently at home using online resources. Students should also be comfortable with using shared online applications (e.g. Google Docs and Forms) and conducting deep Internet and database searches. Ideal candidates will have experience or an interest in advertising, archival research, history, humor, Internet research, parody, satire, and textual and visual analysis. This project seeks three students for 2017-18. 1-4 units can be earned for this project (hours per week are negotiable).

Weekly Hours: to be negotiated

Off-Campus Research Site: Most of the work will be conducted on a computer at home (or anywhere with an Internet connection).