Marjorie Shapiro, Professor

Open (1) Research on Precision Silicon Position Sensors for the LHC and Data Analysis and Simulation Studies for Present and Future Collider Experiments

Open. Apprentices needed for the spring semester. Please do NOT contact faculty before February 5th (the start of the 4th week of classes)! Enter your application on the web beginning January 9th. The deadline to apply is Tuesday, January 23rd at 8 AM.

The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is the most powerful particle accelerator ever built and researchers use its data to study what the universe was like shortly after the big bang. Researchers at Berkeley and the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) play a key role in all aspects of the ATLAS experiment, one of two main detectors at the LHC. Students who join our group work on a variety of projects, ranging from detector development to data analysis.

There are about a dozen ATLAS researchers stationed in Berkeley at any one time and there are a variety of projects available. Picking one of the general projects listed below does not commit you to a particular researcher or project. Projects and mentors are decided during and after the interview process.

Finally, note that in the fall, we offer a once-a-week lecture series that introduces you to experimental particle physics research. We expect students who work with our group for the first time will participate.

(1) Research on Precision Silicon Position Sensors for the LHC

The physics program (discovery of the Higgs boson, etc.) of the ATLAS experiment crucially depends on the detection of charged particle trajectories that bend inside a large solenoidal magnetic field. These tracks are identified by measuring the position of the charged particles passing through a series of silicon layers. The LBNL ATLAS group is one of the leading groups worldwide developing, building, and testing sensor and readout electronics for these silicon layers. Unlike the silicon in the digital camera of your phone, we have to cope with extreme radiation among other challenges and so custom hardware and firmware are required.

Several research tasks associated with this instrumentation development activity are appropriate for undergraduate researchers. These include data taking during irradiation of components, testing and measurement of silicon devices on the wafer probe station, analysis of radiation damage test results, and simulation of the silicon behavior using simple models of the relevant bulk material physics. Please write ‘ATLAS Hardware Project' on your application if you are interested in these research projects.

(2) Data Analysis and Simulation Studies for Present and Future Collider Experiments

The ATLAS experiment is actively taking data - this is a great time to be involved in analysis! Researchers in our group are leading efforts to probe the extreme properties of the Standard Model: the set of known particles and the forces that connect them. This includes studying the newly discovered Higgs boson. In addition, we also are actively involved in searching for new particles and forces that are suggested by many unsolved puzzles in nature. While our group plays a major role in current data analysis, we also have a leading role in studies for future experiments (e.g. ATLAS Upgrade and FCC).

This work involves writing software to analyze the data and then discussing results with researchers at LBNL. We can adjust your work plan based on your interest and level of ability. Reading is an important part of this work and various materials will be made available. Please write ‘ATLAS Analysis Project' on your application if you are interested in this area.


Day-to-day supervisor for this project: members of the LBNL staff

Qualifications: Qualifications: Applicants should at a minimum have taken beginning physics (7A-7B or equivalent), and have some programming experience (Python or C++ preferred). Applicants with electrical engineering, physics, or computer science backgrounds are all welcome. Exact tasks to be performed will be adjusted based on student background and preference. Expect to work at LBL a minimum of 6 hours/week, with some additional time spent reading background material. NOTE: Due to Lawrence Berkeley Lab regulations, we cannot consider any applicant who is under 18 years of age.

Weekly Hours: 6-9 hrs

Off-Campus Research Site: Up the hill at the Berkeley Lab

Related website: http://www-atlas.lbl.gov/
Related website: https://fcc.web.cern.ch/

Open (2) Imaging Lost Voices: High Resolution Optical Scanning of Historical Sound Recordings

Open. Apprentices needed for the spring semester. Please do NOT contact faculty before February 5th (the start of the 4th week of classes)! Enter your application on the web beginning January 9th. The deadline to apply is Tuesday, January 23rd at 8 AM.

Important collections of historical sound recordings exist in archives, libraries, and museums worldwide. Many of these items are delicate and cannot be played by normal means. In this research project we are applying modern optical scanning methods - confocal microscopy and high resolution digital imaging - in order to obtain detailed maps of the surface of these objects. We then apply image and signal processing methods to model the playback process 'virtually' in order to recover and restore the audio content. Among the collections we are studying are recordings of Native Americans collected 100 years ago and held in UC Berkeley's Phoebe Hearst Museum of Anthropology.
The methods and technology applied in this project include imaging, robotics, motion control, and image, signal, and statistical analysis. Students may participate in developing and testing real-time control and data acquisition hardware and software or in the development and application of software for data analysis.
This work provides a unique opportunity for undergrads to experience the research environment, and participate in a project which combines many modern methods and techniques in service to the greater community of scholars, researchers, and the public, concerned with cultural preservation. Please
write 'IRENE' on your application if you are interested in this area.


Qualifications: Some programming skill is preferred. Expect to work under the supervision of a senior research scientist around 9 hours per week on a regular schedule. NOTE: Due to Lawrence Berkeley Lab regulations, we cannot consider any applicant who is under 18 years of age.

Weekly Hours: 6-9 hrs

Off-Campus Research Site: LBNL building 50

Related website: http://irene.lbl.gov/

Open (3) Restoration of Early Native American Sound Recordings

Open. Apprentices needed for the spring semester. Please do NOT contact faculty before February 5th (the start of the 4th week of classes)! Enter your application on the web beginning January 9th. The deadline to apply is Tuesday, January 23rd at 8 AM.

The aim of this project is to systematically recover and preserve a set of 2700 sound recordings, made in the early 20th Century, of Native American speakers across California. This project is a collaboration between Lawrence Berkeley National Lab and the UC Libraries, The Phoebe Hearst Museum of Anthropology, and the Depts. of Linguistics and Physics. The project utilizes an optical scanning system developed at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and modern data analysis methods. The project would be appropriate for motivated students, either in a technical discipline such as physics, computer science, engineering, and math, or students from the humanities and social sciences, including linguistics, music, anthropology, and library and information science, having some interest in technical methods and the digital humanities.

The project was recently profiled in a Physics World podcast:
http://physicsworld.com/cws/article/multimedia/2016/jul/22/podcast-bringing-native-american-voices-back-to-life

If you are interested in this project please write "UCB Cylinder Project" on your application




Qualifications: Some programming skill is preferred but not required. Expect to work under the supervision of a senior research scientist around 9 hours per week on a regular schedule. NOTE: Due to Lawrence Berkeley Lab regulations, we cannot consider any applicant who is under 18 years of age.

Weekly Hours: 9-12 hrs

Off-Campus Research Site: Moffitt Library

Related website: http://irene.lbl.gov/