Le Phuoc, Professor

Open (1) HEAL Initiative Global Health Fellowship Program -- Book Project

Open. Apprentices needed for the fall semester. Please do NOT contact faculty before September 11th (the start of the 4th week of classes)! Enter your application on the web beginning August 16th. The deadline to apply is Tuesday, August 29th at 8 AM.

OUR VISION
Good health is achievable for even the most vulnerable populations in our world when we apply principles of justice, equity, and solidarity.
OUR MISSION
To create, scale, and sustain a pipeline of health professionals to care for the poorest communities at home and abroad.

The HEAL Initiative works in Native American reservations, prisons, and the poorest villages on our planet. We pair dedicated U.S. providers with local health professionals who are already working in these communities. HEAL fellows work together on the frontline for two years. They develop skills essential to global health delivery through immersive training, an on-line Master’s in Public Health at UC Berkeley, and intensive mentorship. HEAL will be sustainable with scale since we leverage existing funds. HEAL makes serving the poorest of the poor the first choice for health professionals.

HEAL is a collaborative effort between faculty at UCSF and UCB. Currently we have 50 fellows who are working in 8 countries. Our fellows are doctors, nurses, nurse practitioners, dentists, pharmacists, and social workers.

Currently we are working on a HEAL book project that will be a series of patient-centered cases to illustrate social theories in global health delivery.

Undergraduate researchers will learn qualitative analysis. Undergraduate researchers will spend a majority of their time assisting interview transcription, literature review, and assistance in drafting and editing book chapters.
Undergraduates will learn skills in qualitative methods, manuscript writing and editing, and get direct mentorship from UCSF/UCB faculty physicians.

Day-to-day supervisor for this project: Phuoc Le, Staff Researcher

Qualifications: Desirable but not essential: experience in qualitative methods Desirable but not essential: effective experience researching journal articles Required: self-starter, team player, flexibility, great writing skills.

Weekly Hours: 6-9 hrs

Related website: https://healinitiative.org
Related website: http://profiles.ucsf.edu/phuoc.le

Closed (2) HEAL Initiative Global Health Fellowship Program -- Mentorship Model Research

Closed. This professor is continuing with Spring 2017 apprentices on this project; no new apprentices needed for Fall 2017.

OUR VISION
Good health is achievable for even the most vulnerable populations in our world when we apply principles of justice, equity, and solidarity.
OUR MISSION
To create, scale, and sustain a pipeline of health professionals to care for the poorest communities at home and abroad.

The HEAL Initiative works in Native American reservations, prisons, and the poorest villages on our planet. We pair dedicated U.S. providers with local health professionals who are already working in these communities. HEAL fellows work together on the frontline for two years. They develop skills essential to global health delivery through immersive training, an on-line Master’s in Public Health at UC Berkeley, and intensive mentorship. HEAL will be sustainable with scale since we leverage existing funds. HEAL makes serving the poorest of the poor the first choice for health professionals.

HEAL is a collaborative effort between faculty at UCSF and UCB. Currently we have 50 fellows who are working in 8 countries. Our fellows are doctors, nurses, nurse practitioners, dentists, pharmacists, and social workers.

Currently we are collecting and analyzing data to evaluate and disseminate our unique mentorship model. Very little is known about the role of mentorship in global health education. We believe the HEAL Initiative mentorship model could provide a template for effective mentorship.

Undergraduate researchers will learn quantitative survey analysis and qualitative methodology, and analysis. Undergraduate researchers will spend a majority of their time assisting with the survey data analysis, interview transcription and coding, literature review, and assistance in drafting manuscripts.
Undergraduates will learn skills in quantitative and qualitative methods, manuscript writing and editing, and get direct mentorship from UCSF/UCB faculty physicians.

Day-to-day supervisor for this project: Phuoc Le, Staff Researcher

Qualifications: Desirable but not essential: experience in literature review Desirable but not essential: experience in data analysis and scientific writing Required: self-starter, team player, flexibility.

Weekly Hours: 6-9 hrs

Related website: https://healinitiative.org
Related website: http://profiles.ucsf.edu/phuoc.le

Closed (3) Homelessness and Adolescence

Closed. This professor is continuing with Spring 2017 apprentices on this project; no new apprentices needed for Fall 2017.

Homelessness has been linked to increased morbidity and mortality, with disproportionately negative effects on still-developing young adults. As increasingly positive evidence of housing-first policies across the United States has become available around adult outcomes, there has been an effort to understand the impact of such policies at transitional aged youth (TAY). In 2014, Community Housing Partnership (CHP) dedicated a building at 5th and Harrison in San Francisco to be a permanent supportive housing model for approximately 40 TAY, age 18-24.

Working with CHP, this UCB and UCSF project has focused on examining the impact of permanent supportive housing on the health and social wellness through surveys, ethnography and biologic data collection.

The project team is starting its follow-up survey and data collection phase. We are seeking a highly-motivated undergraduate student interested in adolescent health, homelessness, and/or health disparities to help with transcription, social network data entry and research support based on their interest.

Day-to-day supervisor for this project: Kara Palanuk, Graduate Student

Weekly Hours: 6-9 hrs