Cybelle Fox, Professor

Closed (1) Intersections of Race and Illegality: A Study of Asian and Latino Undocumented Young Adults

Closed. This professor is continuing with Fall 2018 apprentices on this project; no new apprentices needed for Spring 2019.

The broader project seeks to shed light on the lived experiences of Korean and Mexican undocumented young adults by (1) exploring how racial and cultural discourses might shape everyday lives through in-depth interviews of Korean and Mexican undocumented young adults and (2) examining portrayals of undocumented immigrants in Korean and Spanish language newspapers to understand how the respective communities frame illegality. URAP tasks will focus on the 2nd aspect of the project.



Day-to-day tasks: (1) skimming Spanish-language newspapers to identify the articles that are relevant, (2) managing and organizing newspaper files, and (3) extracting general information about the articles and interviews

This is an invaluable opportunity to get hands-on experience on the data collection process and insight into how data collection relates to the larger research agenda. The faculty mentor will meet with students at the end of the semester to discuss the project as well as broader questions about graduate school and academia. Students will also have brief biweekly meetings with the research supervisor to ask any questions and share reflections that have emerged from data collection.


Day-to-day supervisor for this project: Esther Yoona Cho, Ph.D. candidate

Qualifications: Required: Strong Spanish reading skills, detail-oriented and organized, passion for issues of immigration and race relations.

Weekly Hours: to be negotiated

Closed (2) Boundaries and Intersectional meanings of race, ethnicity, gender, and sexuality among Asian and White American spouses

Applications for Spring 2019 are now closed for this project.

This qualitative project examines what high rates of interracial marriage between Asian and White Americans indicate about race relations and the assimilation of Asian Americans in the United States. Using in-depth interviews, it explores how boundaries and intersectional meanings of race, ethnicity, gender, and sexuality are negotiated and reproduced among Asian and White American spouses, across their extended families, and within their child-rearing practices.


The research apprentice will develop skills and experience transcribing, coding, and analyzing interview data, as well as critically reading and reviewing literature to help situate the research project. This is an excellent opportunity to learn and work through different phases of a research project. Required tasks vary from semester to semester depending on what is needed at the time.

Brief weekly to bi-monthly meetings will be held to address questions, and discuss ongoing work and findings with daily supervisor.



Day-to-day supervisor for this project: Louise Ly, Ph.D. candidate

Qualifications: Detail-oriented, interest in areas of assimilation, race/ethnicity, gender/sexuality, family, intersectionality, and/or interest in transcribing, coding, and analyzing interview data.

Weekly Hours: to be negotiated