Lauren Edelman, Professor

Closed (1) Corporate Transparency on Surveillance

Check back for status

In 2019, Facebook and Google reported receiving over 58,000 and 20,000 search warrants respectively. These third-party businesses are not themselves the subjects of inquiry, but possess evidence relevant to investigations of crimes such as homicide, fraud, and harassment. This project studies how technology companies process search warrants, subpoenas, and other law enforcement requests for evidence.

URAP apprentices will learn to build, code, and analyze two original data sets consisting primarily of Internet-based documentary and archival data: corporate transparency reports and law enforcement guidelines. In so doing, apprentices will gain experience conducting theoretically-informed qualitative and quantitative analysis. They will also learn about privacy and surveillance laws, as well as recent legal, sociological, and political science scholarship on data access and governance.

The overall project supervisor is Lauren Edelman, Agnes Roddy Robb Professor of Law and Professor of Sociology. Day-to-day supervision will be provided by Yan Fang, who is a former consumer protection attorney and is currently a Ph.D. Candidate in Jurisprudence and Social Policy (www.yanfang.info).

Day-to-day supervisor for this project: Yan Fang, Ph.D. candidate

Qualifications: This is an ideal project for students interested in law, technology, surveillance, sociology, political science, legal studies, data science, and/or empirical methods. Applicants should be detail-oriented, well-organized, enthusiastic, and comfortable working independently. Good written and oral communication skills are also important. Some training in the social sciences and familiarity with Excel, R/R Studio, STATA, MAXQDA, and/or statistical analysis would be valuable, but is not required.

Weekly Hours: 6-8 hrs

Off-Campus Research Site: Students can work anywhere (on campus or remotely). Most work requires an Internet connection. The research team will meet weekly or biweekly, usually via Zoom, although some in-person meetings may be scheduled, consistent with team preferences. These meetings are opportunities for discussions of research design, methods, findings, and challenges, as well as for training and mentoring.

Closed (2) Work Law and Contentious Politics: The Fault Lines in the Patchwork Quilt

Check back for status

This project explores the relationship between “work law” and social movements. Work law refers to the patchwork quilt of statutes that regulate work in the U.S. More specifically, the project investigates line-drawing among American social movements through culture and law about the meaning of work and how best to regulate it, from the 1950s through today.

URAP apprentices will have the opportunity to help build and analyze several unique data sets: (1) a data set of newspaper articles discussing select social movement organizations and work from 1950-1980; and (2) a data set of judicial decisions in employment discrimination lawsuits brought against labor unions; and (3) survey experiment data about contemporary attitudes towards labor unions.

URAP apprentices will help implement research strategies, will team and independently code data, and ultimately will have the opportunity to participate in theoretically-informed quantitative and qualitative data analysis.

The overall project supervisor is Lauren Edelman, Agnes Roddy Robb Professor of Law and Professor of Sociology. Day-to-day supervision will be provided by Diana Reddy, who is a former labor lawyer, and current PhD Candidate in Jurisprudence and Social Policy (www.dsreddy.org)

Day-to-day supervisor for this project: Diana Reddy, Ph.D. candidate

Qualifications: This is an ideal project for students interested in any of the following: law, social movements, political economy, labor unions, civil rights, intersectionality, discourse analysis, historical sociology, and empirical methods. Applicants should be detail-oriented, well-organized, creative, collegial, and comfortable taking initiative. Good written and oral communication skills are important. Training in the social sciences preferred, but not required. Familiarity with statistical analysis, and experience with MAXQDA and/or STATA would be highly valuable for some of the work, but is not required.

Weekly Hours: 6-8 hrs

Off-Campus Research Site: Students can work anywhere (on campus or remotely). Work requires an Internet connection. The research team will meet weekly or biweekly, usually via Zoom, although some in-person meetings may be scheduled, consistent with team preferences.