Cecilia Mo, Professor

Closed (1) Vulnerability to Forced Labor and Human Trafficking

Applications for fall 2021 are now closed for this project.

This project is three-fold. First project uses an original nationally-representative survey to examine the prevalence, knowledge, and attitudes surrounding child trafficking and forced labor in Jamaica. Previous studies have reported that in Jamaica, 1 in 12 children work at least one hour a week and of those working children, 71.3% are engaged in child labor. It is believed, however, that these numbers largely undercount the prevalence of child labor and trafficking in the country. The RA will be working on research that uses original survey data to more accurately assess the prevalence of child labor and trafficking, as well as gather more information surrounding knowledge, attitudes, behaviors, and perceptions of trafficking among both adults and children.

The second project assesses an intervention taking place at San Francisco International Airport to reduce human trafficking. SFO is implementing a staff-wide training to better identify human trafficking victims within the airport, as well as starting a sticker campaign to enable victims to gain assistance. The study will examine the effects of these interventions on staff awareness and the reporting of human trafficking cases.

Students will be asked to assist in providing support for project logistics, writing and analysis, including:
- completing a literature review of academic and non-academic sources on human trafficking and forced labor in Jamaica and the United States,
- assisting with quantitative data cleaning, analysis, and write up;
- preparing tables, infographics, and slides for presentations and reports.

Students will develop the following skills:
- conducting quantitative and qualitative data analysis;
- working with survey research design and analysis;
- completing basic programming in R and/or STATA.

Students will be introduced to Professor Mo at the beginning of the semester and will have the chance to discuss project progress, their own research, and/or professional interests with Professor Mo at the end of the semester.

Day-to-day supervisor for this project: Biz Herman, Ph.D. candidate

Qualifications: Qualifications: - Students should be detail-oriented, organized, and self-motivated, and interested in the research areas of human trafficking, human rights, and survey research; - Some experience with programming (R, STATA, Excel, Overleaf) preferred; - Previous knowledge or experience working in the Caribbean is a plus. Please mention any experience with social science research methods (e.g., analyzing data, methods courses, programming experience).

Weekly Hours: 6-8 hrs

Off-Campus Research Site: All work can be done remotely.

Related website: http://htv-lab.com

Closed (2) The Politics of History in Bangladeshi History Textbooks

Applications for fall 2021 are now closed for this project.

This project examines of how official narratives of Bangladesh’s 1971 Liberation War in national social studies textbooks have shifted over time. Since independence, history textbooks in Bangladesh have been sites of contestation, undergoing politically motivated revisions with each new regime that has come into power. With the goal of examining these changes and the effects they have had on the Bangladeshi population, this study includes three levels of analysis: (1) an institutional analysis, which uses process tracing to consider the impact of the actors and institutions who develop curricula and textbooks; (2) a textual analysis, which employs content analysis and quantitative textual analysis to dissect the narratives of the 1971 Liberation War in Bangladeshi social science textbooks and curricula from 1972 to the present; and, (3) an impact analysis, which uses in-depth interviewing, classroom visits, and focus groups to identify the ways that textbook narratives do or do not affect individuals’ lasting views on the 1971 War.

The study utilizes an original data set collected over the course of a year of fieldwork—including over 30 school visits, 150 curricular documents, and 100 interviews across Bangladesh’s seven districts—and proposes fielding a nationwide survey that includes an experimental design as part of the impact analysis. Through these analyses, this work seeks to provide a comprehensive analysis of an evolving narrative over the course of a country’s history, insight into how official narratives are used as tools for political legitimacy, and how politicized revisions impact public perceptions of what it means to have a “true history.”


Students will be asked to:
- translate and prepare textbook narratives and interviews for analysis;
- analyze/code textbook narratives and interview transcripts for emerging themes;
be in regular contact with supervisor, Elizabeth Herman, with any issues, questions, and/or concerns;
- participate in brief, 30 minute weekly calls to conduct research training, address questions, discuss ongoing work, and review findings with research supervisor.

Students will develop the following skills:
- conducting quantitative and qualitative data analysis;
- constructing survey research designs;
- completing basic programming in R.


Day-to-day supervisor for this project: Biz Herman, Graduate Student

Qualifications: - As many texts are in Bangla, fluency in Bangla strongly preferred (please describe your proficiency with Bangla in your applications); - Students should be detail-oriented, organized, and self-motivated; interested in the research areas of politics of history, national identity, and/or collective memory; - Experience with programming is a plus, but not required.

Weekly Hours: 6-8 hrs

Off-Campus Research Site: All meetings will take place remotely.

Related website: www.bizherman.com

Closed (3) Political Dimensions of 9/11 in High School History Textbooks Worldwide

Applications for fall 2021 are now closed for this project.

This research examines representations of the events and aftermath of September 11, 2001 in secondary school history textbooks. It utilizes extensive primary source data collection and construction of an original archive, which includes over 850 textbooks from 90 countries.

Students will be asked to:
- Review and assess relevant literature;
- Conduct research on political institutions that govern educational development in different countries;
- Assist with the creation of an online archive with all the curricular materials, to allow for other researchers to access and interact with the data archive;
- Be in regular contact with supervisor, Biz Herman, with any issues, questions, and/or concerns.

Students will develop the following skills:
- conducting quantitative and qualitative social science research and data analysis;
- understanding the process of developing and carrying out research designs;
- completing basic programming in R.

Students will be introduced to Professor Mo at the beginning of the semester and will have the chance to discuss project progress, their own research, and/or professional interests with Professor Mo at the end of the semester., Ph.D. candidate

Qualifications: Qualifications: - Students should be detail-oriented, organized, and self-motivated; interested in the research areas of the politics of history, education policy, and/or multi-method research; - Some experience with social science research, either qualitative and/or quantitative methods, is a plus, but not required; - Experience with programming is a plus, but not required. Please mention any experience with social science research methods (e.g., analyzing interviews/texts, methods courses, programming experience) in your application.

Weekly Hours: 6-8 hrs

Off-Campus Research Site: All work will be done remotely.

Related website: www.bizherman.com

Closed (4) Mental Health in Post-Conflict and Forced Migration Contexts

Applications for fall 2021 are now closed for this project.

This project focuses on the impact of mental health in post-conflict and forced migration contexts. There are two primary research areas within the larger project: (1) producing a systematic review article on how living through and beyond trauma impact communities affected by conflict and forced migration, and (2) conducting an analysis of how policy and programming on mental health among international organizations has shifted in the past two decades.

Students will be asked to assist in providing support for project research, writing and analysis, including:
- completing reviews of the literature of academic sources on trauma, conflict, and forced labor;
- assisting with quantitative data cleaning, analysis, and write up;
- preparing tables, infographics, and slides for presentations and reports.

Students will develop the following skills:
- conducting quantitative and qualitative data analysis;
- working with survey research design and analysis;
- completing basic programming in R and/or STATA.

Students will be introduced to Professor Mo at the beginning of the semester and will have the chance to discuss project progress, their own research, and/or professional interests with Professor Mo at the end of the semester.

Day-to-day supervisor for this project: Biz Herman, Ph.D. candidate

Qualifications: Qualifications: - Students should be detail-oriented, organized, and self-motivated, and interested in the research areas of global mental health, human rights, and/or peacebuilding; - Some experience with programming (R, STATA, Excel, Overleaf) is a plus, but not required. Please mention any experience with social science research methods (e.g., analyzing data, methods courses, programming experience) in your application.

Weekly Hours: 6-8 hrs

Off-Campus Research Site: All meetings will be conducted remotely.

Related website: https://hsvt.berkeley.edu/